How to Cut a Pomegranate

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How to Cut A Pomegranate

How to Cut a Pomegranate

Pomegranates are like the crabs of the fruit world to me. Let me explain. I don’t want to steam them, smothered in Old Bay (as one does in Maryland) but much like picking crabs on a newspaper-covered table on your deck, getting to the good part of the pomegranate takes a little work. That bright red shell holds the best part of the pom, those ruby-toned arils that bring the tart-sweet-crunch I can’t get enough of.

Check out the video to learn my quick and easy method for cutting a pomegranate in no time!

WARNING! Pomegranate juice stains so grab an apron and avoid cutting them on a light colored or wooden cutting board.

How to Cut a PomegranateHow to Cut a Pomegranate

1. Use a sharp knife to cut about 1/4-inch off the crown end of the pomegranate. (The crown end is on top and actually looks like crown!)

2. Score the pomegranate from top to bottom, being careful not to cut all the way through the skin. Repeat this around the pom until you have 5 or 6 (or more depending on the size of you pomegranate) shallow cuts all the way around the pomegranate’s skin.

3. Use your thumbs to gently pull the pomegranate apart into sections. It should separate along the cuts in the skin.

4. Use your fingers to gently loosen the arils from the white membrane inside.

Pom Season

You’re likely used to seeing pomegranates make their appearance on the culinary scene in fall, just in time for Thanksgiving and Christmas. Depending on the bounty of the season’s harvest, you can find pomegranates in stores as late as February.

Super Food Status

Poms are rich in antioxidants, high in fiber, potassium and vitamin c and low in calories. Eat up! They’re good for you!

How to Cut a PomegranateSeeds or Nah?

Pomegranate arils contain a tiny seed. The seeds pack a little crunch but are typically small (and soft) enough to eat. They’re safe to eat but easy to spit out if they’re not your thing. What you don’t want to eat is the white membrane that holds the arils in place.

Storing Pomegranates

Store whole pomegranates in the fridge for 3-4 weeks. Arils will stay fresh in the fridge for 3-5 days.

 

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How to Cut a Pomegranate

 

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Welcome!

 width= I’m Chef Danielle, personal chef, cooking instructor, food stylist and food writer. I’m teaching you the tips, tools and techniques you need to make cooking simple. Welcome to my kitchen!!
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